NON TRADITIONAL RESEARCH OUTPUTS

ERA ELIGIBILITY AND QUALITY IN THE CREATIVE ARTS


Example D. (Design)

D is a designer who has a particular research interest in the history and application of typography in design. D regularly has the opportunity for open-ended or unrestrictive graphic and web-design projects, and in a two-year period she has explored the relevance of traditional typology to contemporary design. Unencumbered by the demands of clients, D has designed a series of small catalogues, both print and digital, in which she has experimented with retro and invented fonts, formal and “ransom note” paste ups, and many other textural and type presentation formats. All of these publications have been relatively insubstantial, comprising three-card folds,small-scale websites or six-page booklets.However, when viewed as a portfolio they present the opportunity to draw substantial conclusions about the changing nature of typography in contemporary design. In a two-year period, D has entered four minor design research projects (Q2_2)Design and two minor website design projects (S2_4) DigitalCreative Work in My Pubs on the Portal. Most recently, D mounted a small three-person exhibition of Type-based designs with two colleagues at the QUTGallery and D wrote an original 1200 word catalogue essay in which she compared several alphabetical treatises from the Renaissance with type design teaching manuals from the Victorian era and used this as a platform for an analysis of the role of contemporary digital typographers. D did not enter this exhibition on the portal, since the majority of the work had been previously claimed but D claimed the new essay as a (Q2_3)Minor Original creative work – Textual work.

These seven related outputs can be collated under a (Q1_2) portfolio entry where a comprehensive research statement gives the research context to the collected works. Note, if the majority of the related minor outputs were web-based design projects the portfolio entry would be created under the (S1_4) designation.This category includes creative 3D models, including digital outputs of architectural and design projects, computer programs,games, and visual artwork.