NON TRADITIONAL RESEARCH OUTPUTS

ERA ELIGIBILITY AND QUALITY IN THE CREATIVE ARTS


PRIVATE SPACE: HOME OR HOME PAGE

The idea that an artist/performer/musician would use their own studio or residence as a venue reaches back to the nineteenth century when this was commonplace in Europe and the USA. Even so, today only the vanity and commercial necessity of such a strategy seems apparent. This is not to say studio and domestic settings are automatically excluded as venues since in recent times artists have shown it is also possible to use a domestic setting for high impact work. For example in 2009 Chris Bennie established the Moreton Street Spare Room [MSSR] in his domestic dwelling in New Farm, Brisbane and the venue received public funding and exhibitions had significant impact on the Brisbane art scene. Artist run initiatives (ARIs) are also sometimes located in private spaces where collectives of artists produce innovative work that would not find a place in conventional venues. In all such cases the imperative to prove the quality of the outputs shifts significantly to the research statement and the verification of the scope or critical audience feedback.

Web-based exhibitions should not be confused with Website accompaniments to conventional exhibitions. In the latter case, a web version of a conventional exhibition is a duplicate and is not considered a separate item and cannot be claimed as a discrete exhibition. Where a catalogue for a conventional exhibition or show of analogue work is published online it should follow all usual editorial protocols including an ISBN. Substantial catalogue essays published in such an online catalogue should be claimed as Q1_3. Major creative work, Textual work.

The categories (S1_5 and T1_1) for Web-based exhibitions should almost always be used exclusively for audio visual work that is specifically designed to be delivered in digital format. These Web-based exhibitions would normally be hosted on an editorially controlled portal. The publication of a selection of an artist or designer’s work on their internet homepage would be outside usual editorial or peer control and therefore ineligible as a research output.